Forward-Looking DeLuca Pays Huge Dividends

May 7th, 2018

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. State Rep. Anthony DeLuca, D-Chicago Heights, is leading the discussion shedding light on the positive financial impacts gaming expansion is having for communities.

During my time as Mayor of Chicago Heights, I successfully led negotiations for my hometown to be selected as one of ten communities to receive annual portions of gaming revenue generated from the Rivers Casino in Des Plaines, DeLuca stated. Since 2011, the City of Des Plaines has annually sent Chicago Heights dollars totaling over $10.5 million due to this agreement, DeLuca continued.

DeLuca also emphasized that while this agreement with the City of Des Plaines is a significant financial boost for Chicago Heights, it was illegal for small business owners and fraternal organizations to have video gambling in their establishment prior to 2012. Since the recent change in law, many small business owners and organizations in Chicago Heights have now installed video gambling machines resulting in over $750,000 in additional revenue for the city.

Chicago Heights has secured a whopping $11.3 million in revenue from gambling sources that otherwise wouldnt be available for the police & fire departments, roads, and other vital services all while helping to ease the burden of property taxes. I will continue to explore creative ways in which we can help our municipalities across Illinois generate much needed additional revenue, DeLuca said.

 


DeLuca Urges Governor to Sign Monumental Debt Transparency Measure

August 4th, 2017

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – As Illinois’ bill backlog sits at a record $14.3 billion, state Rep. Anthony DeLuca, D-Chicago Heights, is calling on Gov. Rauner to sign legislation that would reform how state agencies manage their finances and reveal the full extent of the state’s debt obligations.

“After two long years, Illinois now has a balanced and bipartisan budget,” DeLuca said. “Despite this, there is a lack of clarity on how many bills need to be paid since many agencies have not submitted them to the comptroller. This legislation will require agencies to report how many bills have not submitted for payment, and ultimately protect tax payers from paying late fees.”

DeLuca’s House Bill 3649 would require agencies to submit a monthly report to the Comptroller on the liabilities they are holding, plus an estimate of the amount of late fees that are accruing. According to the Comptroller’s Office, liabilities are not being reported quickly enough, and, as a result, millions of dollars in penalty fees are accumulating on the overdue bills. By reforming how state agencies report their liabilities, DeLuca is fighting to protect hard-earned taxpayer dollars from being used to pay for financial mismanagement.

“The Debt Transparency Act would give the Governor’s Office, legislators, the media and most importantly the taxpayers of Illinois a much clearer picture of the state’s finances and the amount owed on the state’s unpaid bills,” said State Comptroller Susana Mendoza. “We hope Governor Rauner follows the advice of his fellow Republicans and Democrats and signs the bill.”

House Bill 3649 has passed the General Assembly, and now awaits the governor’s consideration.


Springfield Budget Update 7-5-2017

July 5th, 2017
Over the past two years, I have regularly provided updates on the budget negotiations taking place in Springfield.  It is apparent Illinois’ ongoing financial challenges has finally reached its inevitable breaking point.  A huge contributing factor in the last couple years are the court orders mandating spending levels well above our revenues to pay for it.  All agree we will see catastrophic consequences if we do not pass a budget immediately.
The bond rating agencies, Fitch, S&P, and Moody’s, have declared Illinois’ bond rating would be reduced to “Junk Status” if a balanced budget is not passed by July 1st. (Due to the passage of the House budget plan on July 2nd, Fitch said, “Illinois made concrete progress” and has delayed a downgrade.  On July 4th, the Senate concurred with the House budget and sent it to the governor for his signature.  The Governor immediately vetoed the budget as promised.  The Senate immediately voted to override the Governor’s veto.  The House has not yet scheduled a veto override vote).  In addition to this downgrade which would cost Illinois taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars in higher costs, it would also label Illinois as the first state in history to be reduced to such a status.  Furthermore, without a budget by July 1st, the Illinois Department of Transportation announced the suspension of road construction projects, laying off tens of thousands of hard-working, well-paid employees thus placing our states’ infrastructure at risk. Without action, our schools will be in jeopardy of an opening in the fall, preventing our children from furthering their education.
The deliberations of each issue deepened and were constantly delayed due to the variety of opinions and ideas expressed by each political party.  Various Democrats are upset the FY18 budget, specifically, Senate Bill 6, contains a $3 Billion decrease in spending, along with spending $800 Million less than Governor Rauner’s introduced budget.  Some Democrats believe the proposed income tax rate increase in Senate Bill 9, from 3.75% to 4.95%, should be higher especially for the wealthy.  Many Republicans asked for deeper spending cuts as well as an income tax rate much lower than 4.95%.
Included in the overall budget discussions are issues such as government consolidation, pension reform, procurement reform, property tax relief, K-12 education funding formula, worker compensation reform, as well as the states $15 Billion in unpaid bills piling up in the comptrollers’ office.  The already challenging process is further exasperated by the deep political divide between Governor Rauner and House Speaker Madigan, as the political attacks between the two have been personal, vicious, and crushes any level of trust complicating negotiations.
Both parties have been tirelessly negotiating to reach an agreement and this budget deal may be as close as we get.  It’s certainly not perfect and there’s plenty not to like.  But because it was close, Republicans and Democrats in the Illinois House of Representatives joined together as a super majority and voted Yes to pass this compromise budget plan for Illinois.  At least one organization has offered a “cuts-only” budget translating to an $8 Billion decrease in spending within FY18, which only a couple legislators in Springfield would even consider supporting.  The reality of the matter is a cuts-only budget would never receive the requisite number of votes for passage, which is why we included both a combination of cuts and taxes.
An outline provided below depicts the personal income tax rate a family may have in comparison to our surrounding states:
A family having an annual income of $50,000 will have the following personal income tax rate:
Illinois – (Currently 3.75%)  increasing to 4.95%
Indiana – 3.23%     (Imposes a tax on services)
Wisconsin – 6.27%
Iowa – 7.92%
Missouri – 6%
Kentucky – 5.8%
A family having an annual income of $75,000 will have the following personal income tax rate:
Illinois – (Currently 3.75%)  increasing to 4.95%
Indiana – 3.23%     (Imposes a tax on services)
Wisconsin – 6.27%
Iowa – 8.98%
Missouri – 6%
Kentucky – 6%
A family having an annual income of $150,000 will have the following personal income tax rate:
Illinois – (Currently 3.75%)  increasing to 4.95%
Indiana – 3.23%     (Imposes a tax on services)
Wisconsin – 6.27%
Iowa – 8.98%
Missouri – 6%
Kentucky – 6%
I hope you found this information helpful.  Thank you for your continued help and support!

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